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South Carolina Rifles

The Second South Carolina Rifles was organized during the early spring of 1862 by the addition of a number of transfers and new recruits to the previously organized Fifth South Carolina Infantry Battalion. (This unit had been sometimes unofficially known as the First South Carolina Rifles Battalion.) As originally organized the Second South Carolina Rifles contain­ed eleven companies. In mid-1862 Company "I" appears to have been disbanded and many of it's members saw subsequent service in various South Carolina Heavy Artillery organizations. Like almost all Civil War units the Second South Carolina Rifles was frequently known by an alternate designation derived from the name of it's commanding officer. Names of this type used by or for the regiment are shown below. John V. Moore's Infantry Thomas Thomson's Infantry Davis L. Donnald's Infantry Robert A. Thompson's Infantry Thomas H. Boggs' Infantry Robert E. Bowen's Infantry H. L. Kerr's Infantry N. H. Jenkins' Infantry William C. Wardlaw's Infantry Upong being mustered into Confederate service the regiment was attached to the Department of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida. Not long afterwards it moved north and joined the Army of Northern Virginia. It served with that Army until the early summer of 1863. The regiment then served in the Department of North Carolina and subsequently in the Department of Richmond. After briefly returning to service in the Army of Northern Virginia, the unit moved west with the First Corps of that Army, seeing service in the Army of Tennessee and in the Department of East Tennessee. In the spring of 1864 the regiment rejoined the Army of Northern Virginia, serving in that Army and the remainder of it's career. Listed below are the specific higher command assign­ments of the unit. May 1, 1862 Attached, Second Military District of South Carolina, Department of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida May 31, 1862 Attached, Third Military District of South Carolina, Department of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida July 1, 1862 Second Brigade, Longstreet's Division, Longstreet's Command, Army of Northern Virginia Sept. 20, 1862 Jenkins Brigade, D. R. Jones' Division, Longstreet's Corps, Army of Northern Virginia

Dec. 10, 1862 Jenkins' Brigade, Pickett's Division, First Corps, Army of Northern Virginia

June 1, 1863 Jenkins' Brigade, Department of North Carolina

Aug. 31, 1863 Jenkins' Brigade, Ransom's Division, Department of Richmond

Sept. 11, 1863 Jenkins' Brigade, Hood's Division, First Corps, Army of Northern Virginia

Dot. 1, 1863 Jenkins' Brigade, Hood's Division, Longstreet's Corps, Army of Tennessee

Dec. 10, 1863 Jenkins' Brigade, Hood's Division, Department of East Tennessee

March 31, 1864 Jenkins' Brigade, Field's Division, Department of East Tennessee

May 1, 1864 Jenkins' Brigade, Field's Division, First Corps, Army of Northern Virginia

Aug. 31, 1864 Bratton's Brigade, Field's Division, First Corps, Army of Northern Virginia

The Second South Carolina Rifles participated in more than tour dozen various engagements during it's career. These are identified below.

Numbers after the events locate them on the maps following this history.

Seven Days Battles, Va. June 25 - July 1, 1862

Battle, Mechanicsville (1), Beaver Dam Station (Ellison's June 26, 1862
Mills) (2), VA.

Battle, Gaines Mill (3), Cold Harbor (4), Chickahominy
(5), VA. June 27, 1862

Campaign in Northern Virginia (Second Bull Run Campaign) Aug. 16 - Sept. 2, 1862

Battle, Second Bull Run, Manassas, Groveton Heights, VA.
(6) Aug. 30, 1862

Maryland Campaign Sept. 6 - 22, 1862

Battle, Antietam, Sharpsburg, MI. (7) Sept. 16 - 17, 1862
Operations in Loudon, Faquier, and Rappahannock Counties, Oct. 26 - Nov. 10, 1862, VA. (8)

Battle, Fredericksburq, VA. (9) Dec. 12 – 15, 1862

Siege, Suffolk, VA. (16) April 11 – May 4, 1863

Siege of Suffolk, VA. raised (10) May 4, 1863

Action, Blackwater River, VA. (11) June 16, 1863

Skirmish, Blackwater, VA. (ii) June 17, 1863

Battle, Chickamauga, CA. (12) Sept. 19 - 21, 1863

Siege, Chattanooga, TN. (13) Sept. 22 - Oct. 30, 1863

Engagement, Wauhatchie, TN. (14) Oct. 28 - 29, 1863

Knoxville Campaign Nov. 4 - Dec. 23, 1863

Skirmish near Loudon, TN. (15) Nov. 15, 1863

Action, Lenoir Station, TN. (16) Nov. 15, 1863

Siege, Knoxville, TN. (17) Nov. 17 - Dec. 4, 1863

Engagement, Bean's Station, TN. (18) Dec. 14, 1863

Operations about Dandridge (19) and Massy Creek (20), TN. Dec. 24 - 28, 1863

Engagement, Mossy Creek (20), Talbot Station (21), TN. Dec. 29, 1863

Operations about Dandridge, TN. (19) Jan. 16 - 17, 1864

Engagement near Fair Garden, TN. (22) Jan. 27, 1864

Operations about Dandridge, TN. (19) Jan. 27 - 28, 1864

Wilderness Campaign May. 4 - June 12, 1864

Battle, Wilderness, VA. (23) May 5 - 7, 1864

Battles, Spottsylvania Court House (24), Laurel Hill (25), May 8 - 21, 1864

Ny River, and Fredericksbürg Road (26), VA.

Assault on the Salient, Spattsylvania Court House, VA. (24) May 12, 1864

Operations on the line of the North Anna River, VA. (27) May 22 - 26, 1864

Operations on the line of the Pamunkey River, VA. (28) May 26 - 28, 1864

Operations on the line of the Totopotomoy River, VA. (29) May 28 - 31, 1864

Battles about Cold Harbor, VA. (4) June 1 - 12, 1864

Skirmish near Harrison's Landing, VA. (30) June 14, 1864

Assault, Petersburg, Va. (31) June 15, 1864

Assault, Petersburg, VA. (31) June 16, 1864

Siege Operations against Petersburg and Richmond, VA. (32) June 16, 1864

Assault, Petersburg, VA. (31) June 18, 1864

Engagement, Jerusalem Plank Road (Weldon R. R.), VA. (33) June 22, 1864

Explosion, Petersburg Mine and Assault on the Crater, VA. July 30, 1864 (34)

Demonstration on the North Side of the James River and Aug. 13 - 20, 1864

Engagements at Deep Bottom (35) (Strawberry Plains) (36), Fussell's Mills (37), Bailey's Creek (38), Deep Run, Charles City Cross Roads (39), new Market Road (40), White's Tavern (41), and Four Mile Run (42), VA.

Engagement, Chaffin's Farm (43), Fort Harrison (44), Sept. 29 - 30, 1864
Fort Gilmer (45), New Market Heights (46), and Laurel Hill (47), VA.

Engagement, Darbytown (48) and New Market Road (40), John- Oct. 7, 1864
Son's Farm (49) (Johnson's Creek), and Four Mile Creek (42), VA.

Engagement, Darbytown Road, VA. 48) Oct. 13, 1864

Engagement, Fair Oaks and Darbytown Road near Richmond, Oct 27 - 28, 1864
VA. (50)

Operations against Warren's Expedition to Hicksford, va. Dec.7 - 12, 1864
(51)

Appomattox Campaign March 28 – April 9, 1865

Assault and Capture of Petersburg Lines, VA. (32) April 2, 1865

Surrender, Appomattox Court House, VA. (52) April 9, 1865

More than three hundred members of th e Second South Carolina Rifles surrendered at Appomattox Court House, making it one of the largest units to lay down its arms there. The list below shows the number surrendered by com­pany.

Staff one Colonel, one Lieutenant-Colonel, one Adjutant, one Surgeon, one Sergeant-Major, one Hospital Steward, one Ordnance Sergeant, and eleven Musicians

" A " one Captain, one First -Lieutenant, one Second-Lieutenant, three Sergeants, three Corporals, and thirty-seven Privates

" B " one First - Lieutenant, one Second - Lieutenant, four Sergeants, two Corporals, and eleven Privates

" C " one Captain, one First-Lieutenant, two Sergeants, and twenty-six Privates

" D " one Captain, ans First Lieutenant, three Sergeants, three Corporals, and twenty-two Privates

" E " ans Second-Lieutenant, tour sergeants, two Corporals, and twenty-four Privates

" F " one Captain, one First-Lieutenant, one Second-Lieutenant, four Sergeants, three Corporals, and twenty Privates

" G " and Second - Lieutenant, three sergeants, two Corporals, and twenty-three Privates

" H " Das First-Lieutenant, one Second-Lieutenant, two Sergeants, two Corporals, and fourteen Privates

" K " one Captain, one First-Lieutenant, one Second-Lieutenant, two Sergeants, one Corporal, and seventeen Privates

" L " one First-Lieutenant, one Second-Lieutenant, three Sergeants, three Corporals, and twelve Privates

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